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Daily brief (3/21): Top picks from the Springfield media

Periods of showers today, with up to another three-quarters of an inch of rain possible. The day will start at the high of 57 and drop throughout the day to 51 by 5 p.m.

Showers are likely again tonight, with another quarter of an inch of rain possible. Rain chances dip to 40 percent tomorrow and skies will turn partly cloudy. A high of 65 is expected.

A 30 percent chance rain remains for a mostly cloudy Friday, but Saturday should turn sunny with a high near 68.

A flood watch remains in effect through tonight for much of the Ozarks, including Greene, Christian, and Webster counties. Two schools — Morrisville (water-pressure problems) and Bradleyville — have canceled school today.

Today’s picks

  • OzarksFirst: Live Free Springfield opposes smoking-ban compromise. One Air Alliance, which supports Springfield’s smoking ban, has offered three exceptions — e-cigarettes, private clubs when they’re not open and no employees are present, and retail tobacco shops with more than 70 percent of revenue from tobacco sales — but Live Free Springfield says those aren’t enough.
  • News-Leader: Interest high for farmers market in south Springfield. Sixty-five vendors have signed up to become part of Farmers Market of the Ozarks on East Republic Road. The Springfield City Council will consider a proposal to sell land for the project on Monday.
  • News-Leader: Republic superintendent resigns. Republic Superintendent Vern Minor has resigned, three months after the Republic School Board voted 4-3 against extending his contract. (Other coverage: KSPR)
  • KSPR: South Springfield business owners form new business district. A group of business owners on Republic Road have formed Right on Republic, a marketing group designed to encourage residents to shop locally.
  • KSMU: Community gardens springing up in the Ozarks. Several neighborhoods are planting community gardens, where people share the workload and the bounty.
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